Bilingualism

Bilingualism

Knowledge of languages contributes significantly to the development of the child. Bilingualism has been shown to improve various types of cognitive function and is certainly an important asset in today’s world. Fortunately, languages are absorbed very easily if they are learned in a calculated and consistent way from a young age. Therefore, the “Spotlight” school is a bilingual school that teaches its students to speak both Hebrew and English fluently. In other words, the goal is for “spotlight” students to master the English language, including reading and writing, at the mother tongue level. In addition, during their elementary school studies, the children will learn a third language.
In order to achieve bilingualism in these two languages, we will adopt in the “spotlight” the teaching method called immersion, whose foreign name paints a settlement in the linguistic “water space” for its full learning. According to this approach to language teaching, the usual educational activities and teaching of the subjects are conducted in a foreign language, which is the target language and in our case English. This means that English is the means of instruction as well as its purpose. Students learning in the immersion method develop the language skills necessary for understanding the study material and for active literate and social functions in English. But beyond that, the program’s goal is to bring English proficiency as close as possible to its knowledge as an additional first language and knowledge of the culture in which it is anchored.
The bilingual curriculum at “Spotlight” will provide students with a linguistic input in English and Hebrew, so that each of them can derive the maximum possible for them in order to achieve a high level of linguistic and literacy skills in both languages. This means, in both languages, the development of a native accent, a large and varied vocabulary with internal connections, stable and rich grammatical categories, ways of expression appropriate to the language and an established knowledge of the written language and the culture from which it derives. From all of these, children will be able to continue to develop linguistic and literacy skills in both languages, making effective use of social and learning interaction.